ebyUSA Today notably hurled its McNugget format to the wind April 14, 10 years ago with "Imagine," flooding four news pages with fact and friction, mixing interesting insights from people the four lads from Liverpool influenced with a belly flop in bathos that would make Chris "Garth Brooks" Gaines cringe.

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John Eby: We need some love after 40 years without Beatles

Published 1:18pm Thursday, April 15, 2010

Like the blasphemous July 1977 entry, “John and Paul have listened to a lot of disco, and it shows on the new album, ‘Just to Dance With You.’ Reaction to the album is negative: It barely goes gold, and critics blast it as derivative and needlessly trendy.”

Sounds like the panning the misguided and messy “Magical Mystery Tour” movie deservedly endured.

Or the July 1986 four songs for Live Aid at London’s Wembley Stadium, stumbling through “Get Back,” “Imagine,” “All You Need is Love” and a “peculiar medley” of “Why Don’t We Do It in the Road” and Frankie Goes to Hollywood’s “Relax, marking their first official live performance in 20 years.”

A Green Album of environmental concerns.

A Sex Pistols album, “Never Mind the Beatles.”

Turning down a soundtrack, “Saturday Night Fever.”

The 1989 Woodstock II, where they top a bill ranging from REM to Run-DMC, bringing to life for the first time “Revolver,” “Sgt. Pepper,” the White CD and “Abbey Road” and cover Guns N’ Roses’ “Paradise City” and Roxette’s “The Look.”

In 1993 Kurt Cobain would remind Lennon of himself as Lennon and McCartney pass up the chance to write songs for “The Lion King.”

The June 1987 sequel to Sgt. Pepper with an updated assemblage of celebrities.
Ringo’s 1973 release, “Gringo,” a set of Latin-flavored instrumentals featuring the drummer on timbales, congas and maracas along with Santana members.

Born-again Christians at a Christmas 1998 press conference convincing Lennon the Beatles are no longer bigger than Jesus.

To reach out to new fans, they accept a spot on the closing night’s bill at Woodstock ’99 between Rage Against the Machine and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

“That Sinking Feeling,” Paul’s Celine Dion-sung theme song to the 1997 movie “Titanic.”

Feel like you’ve missed anything yet?

It was the weirdest package invented since National Lampoon devoted an entire issue to parody a target as large as The Beatles.

“They wouldn’t have played Vegas like Elvis. Elvis settled into being a caricature.”Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry said.

Unless, Joe, you count the 26-track “Love” to accompany Cirque du Soleil, which opened at the Mirage in June 2006 thanks to Harrison’s interest in auto racing.

I listen to it constantly because each snippet is like a tweet tumbling out of a way-back blender.

Hot tub time machines weren’t invented yet and only deliver you to the Eighties.
George Martin and his son Giles helped legitimize this exhumation (Best Show in Las Vegas 2008 and 2009).

John’s vocal from “Nowhere Man” welded to the drowsy dirge of “Blue Jay Way,” one calliope wheeze from “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite” dissolving into “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” with a sprinkling of “Helter Skelter.”

Or a stew of “Drive My Car,” “The Word” and “What You’re Doing.”

And “Gnik Nus” – “Sun King” backward, as though red rum killed Lennon.

“Every Beatles album was an epiphany that pinpointed a moment in time. They did more by their third album than we’ll do in our whole career,” said Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler.

Flash forward a decade and Tyler is fresh from more rehab for a world tour starting in May.

Imagine if Paul and Ringo joined with Pete and Roger what creaking we would have been subjected to by The Whotles at halftime of the Super Bowl.

Art Alexakis – remember Everclear? – was 8 when our idols disbanded.

“I distinctly remember crying,” he said in 2000.

Though devastated by the split, he won’t imagine The Beatles post-1970, either.

“I like leaving that question mark,” he says. “It’s fascinating to think about, but it wasn’t meant to be. They were moving in different directions, and Abbey Road, a beautiful, dark and monumental record, was the jumping-off place. What a way to go out.”

“I like leaving that question mark,” he says. “It’s fascinating to think about, but it wasn’t meant to be. They were moving in different directions, and Abbey Road, a beautiful, dark and monumental record, was the jumping-off place. What a way to go out.”

The Beatles remain atop Mount Rockmore because their music endures.

Thanks to the remastered 13 albums, I’m enjoying the back nine on A Hard Day’s Night of “Tell Me Why,” “Any Time at All,” “I’ll Cry Instead” “When I Get Home” and “You Can’t Do That” much more than when I was 7.

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