Buchanan junior Lauren King holds her watercolor painting “Society’s Rule”, which is being featured in the high school’s winter art show this week. Daily Star photo/CRAIG HAUPERT

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Buchanan HS art show is on

Published 5:40pm Wednesday, December 7, 2011

BUCHANAN — Brandon Gillam loves making people laugh. The Buchanan High School junior believes having fun is an important part of life.

“You see people walking around the halls here with blank looks on their faces,” Gillam said. “I just don’t get it. I’d rather be happy.”

Gillam’s sense of humor will be on display at Buchanan High School’s annual winter art show, which runs through Friday. The show features artwork from high school students in the school library.

For the show, Gillam created a caricature of Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard. Gillam took Howard’s trademark smile and exaggerated it by doubling the size of his mouth and teeth.

“(Gillam’s) personality is definitely reflected in his art,” said Sandra Miller, Buchanan art teacher.

The public is invited to attend an artist reception for the show from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. today in the library.

Gillam credits his uncle, Kelly Gillam, of Niles, for sparking his interest in art. Brandon was hooked at age 6 after seeing Kelly’s drawing of Brandon’s grandfather.

“I always thought that was cool, and I wanted to draw, too,” Brandon said. “I started doodling and, eventually, got better at it. Now, I am thinking about taking it and going into cartooning or illustration.”

Much like Brandon, Buchanan junior Lauren King became interested in art at a young age. She got her start by creating comics with a friend.

“I’d draw the pictures, and she’d write the story because I have terrible handwriting,” King said. “It was a lot of fun.”

King’s contribution to the show, called “Society’s Rule,” is done in watercolors.

Its theme is steampunk, meaning it combines elements of science fiction or fantasy in a setting where steam power is used.

“In my painting, everyone is outlined except for one person in the middle. She is just blending in, not really there, being what everyone expects her to be,” King said. “It is more about rebellion and not really wanting to fit in with everyone else’s standards.”

King said she hopes to someday turn art into a career.

“If I become a writer, then I can illustrate my own books,” she said.  “Those would just go hand in hand.”

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