Sixth annual BRAVO recipients returned to the fairgrounds in Cassopolis Aug. 14 (The Daily News/John Eby)
Sixth annual BRAVO recipients returned to the fairgrounds in Cassopolis Aug. 14 (The Daily News/John Eby)

Archived Story

15 of 1,7000 still projects singled out for recognition

Published 9:17am Tuesday, August 18, 2009

CASSOPOLIS – Fifteen youth projects were selected from more than 1,700 for sixth annual BRAVO awards recognized Friday, Aug. 14, with a Pizza Hut luncheon served at the Agnes Gregarek Building on the Cass County Fairgrounds.

Jessica Poulsen, Cass County 4-H youth development Extension educator, introduced guest speaker Cheryl Rogers of Niles.

Rogers, whose daughter, Tiffany, is state FFA president and won showmanship titles at the 158th fair in beef, sheep and draft horses, is a former Cass County 4-H youth agent.
Honorees for 2009 of an award Neil Kentner established in 2003 include:

Jessica Ausra, Dowagiac, Neighborhood Gang, jewelry she wore.

David Brancaleon, Cassopolis, JOY, mosaic table.

Ashley Edgerly, Dowagiac, North Red Hill, tin punch.

Elisabeth Gokey, Dowagiac, North Red Hill, horse model.

Cassie Ivers, Niles, Sleepy Hollow, wild flower arrangement.

Denver Luthringer, Sodus, North Red Hill, welding project.

Beth Miller, Niles, Country Trailblazers, wedding cake.

Santanna Mosher, Jones, Jones Rough Riders, picture collage.

Becca Proctor, Edwardsburg, Busy Friends, a leather purse with horses on it that took her two years to complete.

Karsten Richey, Decatur, 4-W 4-H, pencil drawing.

Ashley Rogers, Niles, Country Trailblazers and Drafted!, poultry record keeping.

Robbie Seem, Cassopolis, Penn 4-H, construction project.

Emily Waldschmidt, Cassopolis, Penn 4-H, memory album.

Cody Wilson, Dowagiac, North Red Hill, self-portrait.

Mary Wright, Cassopolis, Neighborhood Gang, beginning baking.

BRAVO stands for Best Recognized Achievement, Validated Outstanding.

Befitting a reading teacher, Rogers shared a picture book about a wolf at a farm where the animals can read with youngsters.

“You’re just like the wolf in the story,” Rogers said. “You didn’t give up, you kept on trying until you reached your great potential through hard work.”

Not only is Rogers a former first grade teacher, but Emily Waldschmidt was one of her students.

By using this website’s user-contribution features, including comments, photo galleries, or any other feature, you agree to abide by the terms of use. Please read this agreement in its entirety because it contains useful information that will help you better understand the rules and general "good manners" that are expected when contributing content to this website.

Editor's Picks